Author: Brian Gryth

CityCamp Colorado – Bringing Innovation to Life

Colorado’s largest gathering on civic and government innovation will take place this Friday, October 26th. Denver-based nonprofit, OpenColorado is organizing the event. OpenColorado’s mission is support a transformation that will lead to a simple, beautiful, and easy-to-use government.

This event, the third annual CityCamp Colorado, will again bring together community leaders, government employees, technology experts, and citizens to share ideas to enhance government transparency, citizen participation, and accountability. The overall goal is to create solutions to support more informed, healthy, and livable communities. Over 150 people are registered to attend CityCamp Colorado, which will be held in the Atrium of Denver’s Wellington E. Webb Building.

The Webb Atrium is a wide open public space, which will make for an engaging and accessible camp. “The Webb Atrium will give both attendees and the public a glimpse into civic innovation in Colorado” OpenColorado President Brian Gryth said.

Starting at 8:30 AM, we will host breakfast for Denver Startup Week. At 9:00 AM, we will kick the day off with coffee and inspiration with Ignite CityCamp Colorado. The Ignite will celebrate ideas and innovations that are transforming our communities. We have seven presenters who will provide thought fuel for our day. Denver Councilwoman Robin Kniech and Chuck Fredrick, the City of Denver Chief Information Officer will then take the stage to make remarks about the future of Denver government.

At 10:30, Brian Gryth, OpenColorado Preseident, and Jason Lally, the Leader of Colorado Code for Communities, will announce the 2012 Roadmap: an aggressive plan to kick start a transformation of Colorado government.

We will also have demonstrations from several groups showing off civic websites and mobile applications that are improving Colorado communities.

More information about the event is at opencolorado.org/citycamp-colorado/.

Model Local Open Government Directive

In December, Kevin Curry, Alissa Black, Scott Primeau, and I began working on a model open government directive while at Citycamp Colorado.  After a flurry of work over the last month, we, with the help of a few dozen additional open government advocates, are able to bring you the model directive for local government.  This directive will help municipalities and state governments bring about open government in their communities.

As we state in the comments to the directive’s introduction:

The model Local Open Government Directive is intended to be an executive initiated order or directive to the local government under the executive’s legal authority.  An executive leader, such as a mayor, should use this model to adopt a directive for the city to help institutionalize open government principles within the city government.  This model may be tailored to meet the needs of the particular locality.

  

We modified, tailored, and improved the Federal open government directive for local government.  I encourage you to share this model directive with leaders in your communities and to lend support to our global open government efforts.  In partnership with OpenPlans, we are hosting the directive at opengovernmentinitative.org.  In the next couple of days, you will find multiple versions of the directive to fit your needs for sharing the directive with others.

In addition, our friends at the Sunlight Foundation have created a site where you can sign up to show your support for this effort.  Please sign up at http://publicequalsonline.com/localopengovdirective/

Finally, over the next few weeks and months, we intend to continue to create supporting materials and to draft model open government legislation to help institutionalize open government at all levels.  Together we can make transparency, participation, and collaboration possible in our governments.  If you are interested in getting more involved, please join the Open Government Initiative group.  

In addition to Kevin, Alissa, and Scott, I’d like to particularly thank Philip Ashlock, Nicole Aro, and Sean Hudson.  I am forgetting a number of people, but thanks to everyone that participated in the Open Government Initiative group.